Film Photography Podcast 182

Posted: 03/29/2018
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Film Photography Podcast – Episode 182 – April 1st, 2018
Show Notes By Alex Luyckx

Joining Michael Raso around the table today is Mark Dalzell and John Fedele. We’re getting back into the grove, today’s topics include Used Gear Prices, Listener Letters, The Crown Graphic, What’s new in the Shop, Grimm Custom Albums and much more! So put on your favourite corduroy coat and grab a can of Mr Brown Iced Coffee, we have podcast sign!


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Grimm Custom Albums
FPP Listener Iris writes in with something that might be of interest to many FPP listener. Custom photo albums, each handcrafted. Sure you can get the standard print sizes (4x6, 5x7, and 8x10) but also you have a wide range of Polaroid and Fuji Instax formats. If you’re looking a fun way to store and show off your work why not check out grimm-books.com!



What’s New in the FPP Store?
Over the break, we’ve been working hard to bring out some new products in the store! So what can you find currently? Well, we have our line of hand-rolled B&W film. There are three speeds, FPP B&W 100 (which is ORWO UN54+ a stunning 100-speed),  FPP B&W 200 is the amazing surveillance variant of Fomapan 200 and finally, there’s the fast FPP B&W 400 (which is ORWO NP74+) a 400-speed film. Want to give all three a try, pick up a sampler today!



We’ve also put out our line of Darkroom chemistry, designed for those looking to do their home B&W developing but are a little tight for space, and also don’t want to mix up gallons of chemistry at a time. For developers, there’s the FPP-76 Developer (a powder that makes 1-Liter), FPP-110 Developer in a convenient 8 oz concentrate. We also have bottles of our FPP Foto Flo and our FPP Archival Permanent Wash, and we’re also planning on releasing a 1 Liter powder Fixer as well! Check out all our darkroom supplies on offer in the store!



Finally, if you grew up in a certain era, you’ll be sure to remember the disposable cameras that you often still see in drug stores. Well, we now stock Kodak Funsavers in the shop! Loaded with Kodak 800-Speed Colour Negative (C-41) Film, the fixed focus cameras are a unique way to capture family trips or other adventures. There’s even a built-in flash!



Kodak TMax P3200 Returns
Yes, we at the FPP have gotten our hands on the release of Kodak’s fastest film, Kodak TMax P3200! And well we’re going to go more in-depth on our next episode Mark has a bit of a preview. His first few shots were done at an insane ISO-25,000, they didn’t turn out. But his second attempt at a slightly slower ISO-20,000 turned out much better. Mark used Kodak XTOL (Stock) to develop it. The results are high-contrast and rather grainy but a fun film according to Mark!



Mark D and his Graflex Crown Graphic!
Not sure about you, but there’s a certain appeal of a big red button. But in this case, it’s a button that Mark found on his recently acquired 1955 Crown Graphic. Now for those who don’t know, the Crown Graphic is a cousin to the iconic Speed Graphic, the only thing separating the two is the lack of a focal plane shutter. Also, the 1955 model of the Crown Graphic marked a change in the camera itself, gone is the Kalart side mounted rangefinder it was replaced with a top-mounted rangefinder. It’s on this top mounted rangefinder that you see the big red button. It took some time for Mark to figure out what the button did, but he found out it is a rangefinder illuminator, but not in the way you might first think. Rather upon pushing the button in a dark room, and having the pair of AA batteries installed, it will project a pair of light beams, then all you have to do is align the images in your rangefinder. According to Mark if you have your rangefinder correctly calibrated, you can nail your focus every time. If your bulb is burned out, it’s a simple replacement! Make sure it’s a tungsten-based bulb, and it requires a filament to work properly.



Monobaths!
The gnomes at the FPP labs have been working hard and we’ve been developing (pun intended) something new, a monobath! If you’re not familiar with monobaths, this is a singular chemical that will develop, stop, and fix your film! The idea isn’t a new one, Donald Qualls proposed one based around Kodak HC-110 in 2004. Also, two FPP super friends, Michael Bartosek and Alex Luyckx have both played around with monobaths. So stay tuned to the FPP to see what the gang thinks about the monobath idea!

That’s it for this show, but don’t fear, we’ll be back with the whole gang in a short two weeks! Until then you can reach out to us by email at podcast@filmphotographyproject.com or by regular post, Film Photography Podcast PO Box 264 Fair Lawn NJ 07410. And be sure to sign up for our weekly newsletter to learn about the latest and gain access to special deal in the store!

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