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110 Processing - The Gauntlet

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Nano_Burger's picture
Nano_Burger
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Joined: 08/30/2011

OK,

     Mike has declared that 2012 is the year of 110 film...thrown down the gauntlet as it were.  Yeah, he could have chose a better year...like 2016 (for 16mm) or 2110 (pretty sure our insect overlords will be running things be then) but whatever.

How can we of the great unwashed encourage small thinking among our mini, medium, and large format brethren?  My ideas:


1.  Focus blogs, instructables, and eBay recommendations on high end 110 cameras like the Kodak Pocket Instamatic 60, Minolta 110 zoom (mark I and II), Canon 110ed20 and the like.  The quality images from such a small package are sure to impress.?.!


2.  Find viable workarounds for the infamous "K" battery that is keeping so many great submini shooters from realizing their full (or any) potential .


3.  Promote the sea of crappy 110 cameras as "Lomographyesce" imaging machines.


4.  Promote reloading of 110 cartridges with popular emulsions (to include black and white).


5.  Build a database of 110/16mm processing labs.


6.  Bring back Dick Van Dyke for a retro 110 campaign!


Your ideas below:

 

Michael's picture
Michael (not verified)
Processing and reloading
I'd like info on reloading cartridges and processing 110
Emily Savill's picture
Emily Savill
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Joined: 07/19/2011
A list of processing labs

A list of processing labs would be good.  I shot my first roll of 110 film in December and took it to my local lab who sent it out, to Dwayne's I assume.  Blue Moon Camera also does 110 film, but I don't know of any other labs other than those two.

Michael's picture
Michael Raso (not verified)
In 2012, here is the list of

In 2012, here is the list of labs in the US that will handle 110 film

The Dark Room

The DarkRoom - 110 process, print and scan - http://thedarkroom.com/

Sharp Photo - process and print - http://www.sharpphoto.net/

Blue Moon Camera - process and print - http://www.bluemooncamera.com/

Dwayne's Photo - process and print - http://www.dwaynesphoto.com/

Clark Color Labs - process and print - http://www.clarkcolor.com/clark/

Anyone have a lab list (with URLs) for outside the US?

ruskidd's picture
ruskidd
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Joined: 12/10/2011
process in australia

here is a list for all those aussie FPPers to get their 110 film  processed in australia:

Melbourne

Fuji Lab
206 Commercial St, Prahran (near Chapel St) P: 03 9510 2266

Michaels camera store
265-269 Elizabeth Street

Sydney

Platinum imaging
54 Oxford St, Paddington, NSW 2021 P: 02-8356-9841

CFM Photo & Stationery
Shop 1, 189 Kent St Sydney NSW 2000 P: 02-9252 2238

Digital and Photo World
Shop 10, Cnr Pitt and Goulburn St, Sydney NSW 2000 P: 02-9261-1987

Fotolab
303 Pitt St, Sydney NSW 2000 P: 02-9283 3721

Fotolab
171a Castlereagh St, Sydney NSW 2000 P: 02-9264-5548

Roya Express Kodak
22A Lvl 6 MLC Centre Martin Pl Sydney NSW 2000 P: 02-9223 9006

South Australia

Hutt St Photos (YES) 186 Hutt St Adelaide S.A.
5000
www.huttstreetphotos.com.au

Diamonds Camera, Video & Digital 165-171 Rundle Street
Adelaide SA 5000
P: (08) 8224 0665
*(can process but can’t print)

Western Australia

Fitzgerald Photo Labs
Can develop it but cannot print it unfortunately. $5.70 a roll.
Can get the custom prints at Mirage Photographic Lab, see below. 350 Fitzgerald Street
North Perth WA 6006
P: (08) 9328 3778W: www.fitzgeraldphoto.com.au

Mirage Photographic lab
www.miragephoto.com.au
88 Hay Street, Subiaco WA 6009
P: (08) 9388 9333
E: miragephoto@space.net.au


taken from http://www.viaalley.com

pdexposures's picture
pdexposures
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Joined: 01/16/2012
Correct me if I'm wrong. But

Correct me if I'm wrong. But I thought part of the problem was that you can't reload 110 film cartridges. Don't they need to be destroyed to get the film out?

bblhed's picture
bblhed
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Joined: 01/16/2012
I would be willing to bet

I would be willing to bet that if your careful you could reload 110 cassetts, people do it with 126.

filmfanatic's picture
filmfanatic
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Joined: 03/08/2012
Some sites for help reloading 110 film cartridges
Mike Durling's picture
Mike Durling
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Joined: 01/31/2012
Scanning 110 Negatives
I'm thinking of making reusable cardboard slide mounts to hold the 110 negatives. (once I solve the K battery problem) That way they can be scanned in any film scanner with a slide adapter.
Mike Durling's picture
Mike Durling
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Joined: 01/31/2012
K Battery replacement
I've made a work-around for the unavailable K battery in the Kodak Pocket Instamatic 60 that I recently picked up. I found that three #357 cells taped together will fit vertically in the camera. I took some metallic aluminum tape and wrapped it around the stack so it will make contact with the positive terminal in the camera. Details can be found in this set: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mcdurl/6859934243/in/set-72157629278980033/
filmfanatic's picture
filmfanatic
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Joined: 03/08/2012
K Battery Replacement

Hey Mike your fix worked.  I went out to your Flickr site and looked at the 5 pics describing how to make the K battery.  You helped me bring a Kodak pocket instamatic 60 back to life.  I can't tell you how happy I was to see that battery check light come on.  Total cost for batteries and aluminum foil tape was less than $10.00.  This was so much easier than rebuilding an old K battery.  I can now get two other Kodak 110 cameras up and running.  I owe you big time.   Thanks for all of your help, I really appreciate it.

Mike Durling's picture
Mike Durling
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Joined: 01/31/2012
I'm glad it worked for you.
I'm glad it worked for you. It seems like we have to bring these things back one at a time. Keep an eye out for symptoms that the batteries are getting weak. These might include the shutter closing too soon on available light shots, and the low-light warning light getting weak. I seem to be experiencing these but won't know for sure if I have a problem until the film comes back.
patrick j clarke's picture
patrick j clarke
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Joined: 02/17/2012
Tank and reel for
filmfanatic's picture
filmfanatic
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Joined: 03/08/2012
More US sites for 110 film developing
Nano_Burger's picture
Nano_Burger
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Joined: 08/30/2011
My reloading tutorial
Nano_Burger's picture
Nano_Burger
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Joined: 08/30/2011
Reload Tutorial
Nano_Burger's picture
Nano_Burger
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Joined: 08/30/2011
Home Made Scanning Mask For 110 film
adoephoto's picture
adoephoto
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Joined: 01/16/2012
Thanks Nano! I may have to

Thanks Nano! I may have to give this a go this weekend.

mcduff's picture
mcduff
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Joined: 05/28/2012
Thanks!

Thanks nano_burger! I was doing the "taping to the bed" technique and it was driving me nuts! So I will make one of these holders and try them out when I get more Orca film (arrrgh, they are out of stock right now -- I hope it is a good thing).

don

 

Michael's picture
alex luyckx (not verified)
For Canadians in the GTA,

For Canadians in the GTA, Burlington Camera does 110, as long as it's C-41, scans are pricey at $3.00 per frame.

stapo101's picture
stapo101
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Joined: 08/13/2012
Film slitting and reloading

Hi, I just wanted to add my thoughts on my (current) favourite film format.

My current favourite 110 cameras are my Pentax Auto SLR (in particular the 70mm telephoto lens), my Minolta 110 Zoom SLR (a little trickier to use than the Pentax but you can get really nice DOF and Bokeh effects, and it has zoom and macro). I also very much like the Rollei A110.

I have several cheaper point and shoot 110 models which probably aren't going to get used much. I have also just acquired a Kodak Instamatic 60 and am going to try and rig up a battery using the guide posted by Mike Durling above. I have heard a lot of good things about this camera but am pretty underwhelmed by it's looks. It looks more like the low end cheap shooters rather than the SLR 110 cameras but I look forward to seeing the results.

On the topic of batteries, a while ago I had to find a battery for the Rollei a110. It took a fairly small 4.5v battery originally. In Maplins (uk store similar to Radio Shack) I found a small 4.5v battery that looks like it was meant for a car key fob. It was a bit too small for the battery compartment but with the help of a small metal spring that I attached to one end it worked a treat and lasts a long time. I don't have the details on me at the moment but I will get them and post here. I am thinking it may also be a good replacement for the K battery.

I had the good fortune a while ago to buy a batch of 30 Kodak gold 400 asa 110 films. They are still giving great results and are being stored in my film fridge. Here is a recent example:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/81646658@N03/7625006276/

I develop all of my film at home in the kitchen sink (although I have recently got a Jobo CPE-2 processor that I have modified to accept a patterson tank which means that I can use my 110 patterson reels). Extracting the film from the cartridge isn't too hard. All you need is a changing bag and a very sharp craft knife - and CARE! If done carefully, you can re-use the cartridge and the backing paper.

I have reloaded several cartridges. I used to do so without the backing paper, however, I got frustrated with overlapping images and never knowing when the film is finished. I now reload the cartridges and re-use the backing paper, but I don't bother putting sprocket holes in the film. It really isn't necessary and is an incredibly fiddly job.

Here are my tips for reloading:
1) make yourself a good film slitter. This is easier than it sounds. I managed to make one using scraps of ply-wood, perspex and cardboard that I had in the shed, together with 3 razor blades and some felt. Here are some images of it, it's not pretty but it works: http://flic.kr/s/aHsjBnkkA9 I think you can get them on ebay now and again.
2)My best advice for using a film slitter is to mount it at the top of a door. Obviously make sure this is done in a room which can be made lightproof (a downstairs toilet works well). Mounting it at the top of a door gives you both hands free and gives you the necessary drop to pull the film through the slitter in one easy, smooth motion - this is essential for a clean cut and a straight cut. Until I mounted the slitter on the door I had very patchy results slitting in a changing bag.
3) Use 120 roll film for your slitting. The way I have my slitter configured means that I get one roll of 110 film and one roll of un-perforated 35mm film from the one roll of 120. It also removes a few milimetres from each edge of the 120 roll so that you don't get any intrusive markings from the original film.
4) Use your bonus 35mm un-perforated film to load into an old 126 cartridge and stick it in a Kodak Instamatic - great fun!
5) I'm not going to lie, loading the slit film and backing paper into the empty cartridge takes some concentration but it gets much easier with practice
6) get some good lightproof paper tape to tape up the parts of the reloaded cartridge that could leak light - both edges (take care not to cover the speed selector tab) and the 2 bits that you cut into with the craft knife to open the cartridge in the first place (here is the tape that I use: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/290714195221?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649#ht_500wt_923)

My current project is to try and get the right combination of camera and film to evoke a super-8 kind of feel to the photographs - without resorting to photoshop.  I think the 110 format lends itself very well to this being a relatively small format.  I have recently shot some Kodak E100vs through the Pentax.  I believe this is the same film stock that is currently used by Kodak for their Ektachrome E100D super-8 films.  The film produces very vivid saturated colours.  Here are a couple of results from the test:

http://flic.kr/p/cQQbxo  and  http://flic.kr/p/cQQc9N

They are pretty rough scans but you get the idea.  I have some old stock of Kodak Ektachrome 64 EPR 120 film on it's way and am hoping this provides some decent results also.

 

One last point worth noting - not all 110 cameras will take reloaded cartridges without sprocket holes.  The Pentax does it with no problem, the Minolta needs a little piece of the cartridge filed away.  I think there is a reference list somehwere on the submin website that tells you which ones work.

Anyway, I hope this long and rambling post has been somewhat useful.

vwtazz's picture
vwtazz
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Joined: 11/03/2012
Avoid Lomography lab...

I was so excited to see 110 film come back and immediately bought 5 rolls(4 color and one B&W)! I shot a roll and logged into the Lomo site to get it developed. Unfortunately they didn't seem as eager to develop the film as I was. After 18 days and 3 emails, one ignored completely. I told them to refund my $$ and now I have to find a new place. I was disappointed that they would not support there product better.
This is not the first time they took there time shipping things to me. I can not recommend them for developing. "The Darkroom" here I come!

Michael Raso's picture
Michael Raso
Online
Joined: 06/14/2011
I've personally used the Lomo

I've personally used the Lomo Lab NYC via mail. It wasn't the easiest process (you order the service on-line, wait for a pre-paid mail via mail and then send your film). It took days just to get the mailer. The entire process took 3+ weeks.

Their communication was slow but very helpful. I'm hoping that in 2013 Lomography implements a cleaner, faster, more efficient service for processing!

vwtazz's picture
vwtazz
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Joined: 11/03/2012
I agree completely

I love the 110 format so much that I have bought 2 Minolta 110 zoom Mk2's ,I have G.A.S. in the worst way.

I want Lomography to succeed with the 110 push and may give try them in the futrure. For now I will use The Darkroom for developing and get my film here at the FPP.

K.C.

Bakersfield Ca.

p.s. you should look at those minolta slr 110's

vwtazz's picture
vwtazz
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Joined: 11/03/2012
Finally got my 110 film back but....

Well I sent my film to Swan's labs through my local lab and was charged $1.99 A FRAME! Two rolls with 44 frames total was $91 with tax!!! With pricing like that it was painfull to sit down and type this post...

Gotta rethink this:

K.C.

filmfanatic's picture
filmfanatic
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Joined: 03/08/2012
Anyone intertested in a Vivitar 742XL camera?

I have read about how great the Pentax 110's, Canon ED's, Rollei's, AGFA's, Kodak 60's, and Voigtlander's are and I have over 20 110 format cameras including several of those mentioned above and my Vivitar 742XL out performs and out specs them all, except for the Minox and the Rollei.  It truly is a rare and misunderstood high end 110 camera.

Below is some info about the camera posted on the Subclub.org website.

(1978) Focusing 24mm f1.9 -- f16.0 lens (five elements in four groups). Built-in rangefinder for accurate focusing -- two feet to infinity. Electronic shutter with speed of 5 seconds to 1/800.  Programmed exposure provides, 1/800 at f16 to 1/30 at f1.9.  Below that the shutter speed decreases.  No exposure control. Accepts 100 and 400 speed film.  Built-in flash good to nearly 40 feet (with ISO 400 film). Tripod socket and cable release socket.  Viewfinder shows low light warning -- use flash, flash ready, and battey check.  Uses two AA batteries

 

 

 

 

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